Reviews

‘Devernay’s Snow Queen is the epitome of icy command’

Christopher Hampson's The Snow Queen, The Herald, December 2019

‘imperiously performed by the superb Constance Devernay, the star of the show.’

Christopher Hampson's The Snow Queen, Broadway Baby, December 2019

‘Devernay is now dramatically at the top of her game and the company – just stunning.’

Helen Pickett's The Crucible, Dance Tabs, August 2019

‘Constance Devernay was unsettlingly superb as Abigal’

Helen Pickett's The Crucible, Daily Mail, August 2019

‘stealing the show – is Devernay, who is spectacular as Abigail. She revels her role...a marvel to watch’

Helen Pickett's The Crucible, The Wee Review, August 2019

‘Constance Devernay, dancing the role of the supremely confident Stoptime...epitomises its sassiness.'’

Sir Kenneth Macmillans Elite Syncopations, The Telegraph, March 2019

‘Special mention too for the Golden Hours rag with Constance Devernay and Andrew Peasgood as the hopelessly innocent lovers.’

Sir Kenneth Macmillans Elite Syncopations, Dance Tabs, March 2019

‘Devernay is clearly on a roll at the moment and her Cinders was real and touchingly coloured. You believe in her plight and the fortitude she shows, while admiring her quietly stunning technique.’

Christopher Hampson's Cinderella, Dance Tabs, January 2019

‘the best ugly sisters I’ve ever seen – take a bow Constance Devernay (short) and Aisling Brangan (tall).’

Christopher Hampson's Cinderella, Dance Tabs, December 2018

‘Devernay is all of a minx, playfully darting around and enchanted by the real word and the prince of a man she spies. She too is an innocent, looking all too fallible, made stunningly readable in Devernay’s body language, even from under a mask of ghostly makeup.’

Matthew Bourne's Highland Fling, Dance Tabs, April 2018

‘Constance Deverney, as the Snow Queen, dances with effortless elegance, and her elevation in the batterie and amazing flexibility are a pleasure to watch.’

Peter Darrell's The Nutcracker, Bachtrack, December 2017

‘Constance Devernay glinted and shone with glacial, enigmatic charm’

Kenneth MacMillan's The Fairy's Kiss, The Herald, 2017

‘Earlier in the week, Constance Devernay had danced Cinderella for the first time, taking ownership of the steps with a quick, bright finesse but underpinning that technique with tremendously expressive acting skills. You felt, with her and through her, the magic of discovering unexpected happiness: a joy to watch.’

Christopher Hampson's Cinderella, The Herald, 2015

‘Constance Devernay's Sugar Plum Fairy is enchanting and succeeds in outshining the jewel coloured baubles which decorate her realm.’

Peter Darrell's The Nutcracker, Ellon Advertiser, January 2015

‘Sugar Plum Fairy Constance Devernay looks born to dance en pointe – as if that’s how she potters about her Sugar Plum house all day.’

Peter Darrell's The Nutcracker, The List, December 2014

‘The French variation (the Dance of the Mirlitons) was brilliantly executed by three French dancers, Laura Joffre, Claire Souet and Constance Devernay, who in their pink wigs and frothy cabaret corsets were as sweet and arch as a fondant fancy. ’

Peter Darrell's The Nutcracker, The Arts Desk, December 2014

‘Constance Devernay (Gretel) is a splendid bossy boots, forever on Hansel's case.’

Christopher Hampson's Hansel & Gretel, The Herald, December 2013

‘Constance Devernay’s Gretel is a particular star for her fresh energy and expansive jumps.’

Christopher Hampson's Hansel & Gretel, The Arts Desk, December 2013

‘There’s a key moment early on when both kneel and bow down, as if in obeisance to some greater force. As Faith (Constance Devernay) enters over the rear ramp, dressed in a white tunic, her name evidently bears significance. At first, to plangent music for the basson, she treats both brothers equally before driving them literally up the wall. On pointe, she is delicate and athletic, her legs and feet like weapons.’

Christopher Hampson's The Rite of Spring, Dance Tabs, October 2013

‘Constance Devernay debuts in the Bad Snowflake role with spirited spiky malevolence.’

Ashley Page's The Nutcracker, The Herald, January 2010